My Dad Hated Cairo

You know those questions you want to ask but you no longer can?

I have a few of those.

My dad, who had all the answers (you know how some dads just do), passed away with no warning and now I am left with a disorganized inventory of clouded memories.

Together we shared hundreds of travel books, travel stories, travel dreams and trips to South Korea, Cambodia, South Africa, Lesotho, Swaziland, India and Europe. He had completed his bucket list, short of one balloon ride. I hope I can say the same.

He had seen a lot of the world. Much of it before tourism caught on… that sole traveller in a jungle in the Amazon with the blow dart gun when tour groups were unheard of and hotel bookings were done by letter months in advance. That intrepid traveller willing to do anything once, including swimming with the water buffalo in the Mekong River – as seen in the header. Note to dad: Sorry, I know you would not be happy about your tummy being exposed but I guess you are not in a position to do anything about it now . πŸ™‚

And of all those stellar five star travel memories that we have shared, I only remember one place he truly didn’t like.

My dad hated Cairo!

Now my dad was a slow mover and in the travel world, this means an easier target. He was a beacon, a green light, a neon flashing sign, for all the touts of Cairo. Notorious for slowly trodding, slowly talking, slowly paying, slowly moving on, he would gather his adoring fans, desiring his attention, attention of course he never sought and never liked.

So as I plan to move to Cairo to live, I don’t remember which African country he loved the most… I can’t remember if he spent time at Lake Malawi… I can’t remember which refugee camps he visited… I can’t remember his tales of Israel and Palestine… I only clearly remember…

He hated Cairo! Ugh…

Sorry dad, but we are still going.

(In the meantime, I am in training to speed up my pace and quicken my mind so I can out walk and outlast the touts and their infamous maneuvers that my dad never forgot. And since we are going to live in Cairo, I know that our experience will be different and uniquely our’s. Especially when my daughter, who is accompanying me, is the most positive enthusiastic traveller out there. Her travel cup is always half full!)

Have you lost a loved one and had questions you wished you could still ask?Β 

34 comments

  1. Manja Mexi Movie · August 18, 2015

    πŸ™‚ Sometimes it happens in this least likely way.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Aisha Abdelhamid · June 3, 2015

    Hahaha my Dad hated Cairo, too – we’re still quoting him whenever we get ticked off by anything here – “Get me OUT of this F#@&ing Country!” Hahaha, great post, wonderful Dad, just like mine! β™₯β™₯β™₯;^)

    Liked by 1 person

    • lovetotrav · June 4, 2015

      Isn’t that funny and now it is your home! I guess dads let you know how they feel!

      Liked by 1 person

  3. openhearttravel · May 31, 2015

    Dear Terry, your post is truly touching. I lost my father a little over a year ago, and have to say, he didn’t like the idea of me visiting Cairo one bit either! There are many reasons one could not like Cairo, but there are a thousand more to absolutely fall in love with it. Wishing you the very best. Happy travels!

    Liked by 1 person

    • lovetotrav · May 31, 2015

      Thank you so much. I am sure we will love most of it. I really appreciate your comment. Have a great day, Cheryl

      Liked by 1 person

      • openhearttravel · May 31, 2015

        You’re welcome Cheryl!
        I trust you will indeed. πŸ™‚ If you ever need an affordable and wonderful place to stay for visiting friends or family check out Paris Hotel. They have private rooms and hostel style accommodations, are incredibly clean and the owners who are twins and staff are just the best. The building its in looks very rundown from the outside, but its really cute inside. Just keep in mind, the elevator is broken half the time. πŸ™‚ Hey, those are little things compared to what you get for the price. Here’s a link: http://www.tripadvisor.com/Hotel_Review-g294201-d630004-Reviews-Paris_Hotel-Cairo_Cairo_Governorate.html

        P.S Sorry I called you Terry just now, that was a Freudian slip, I just realized I had been thinking of my mom. :))

        Liked by 1 person

      • lovetotrav · May 31, 2015

        Thanks so much! I will bookmark the Paris Hotel as I am sure there will be a few who may come and visit. Always great to have a friendly place to start out in. And no worries about Terry.. a reference to your mom must be a good thing πŸ™‚

        Like

  4. unfinishedtravel · May 31, 2015

    It seems that your dad was quite the adventurer. I often wished I’d asked my grandparents more questions about their lives. They lived through the independence movement in India, which is such an interesting period of history to me. I’ve been trying to talk to older relatives more and more whenever I’m in India and write down their stories, so they aren’t forgotten.

    Liked by 1 person

    • lovetotrav · May 31, 2015

      How fascinating…. the independence movement. Good for you to be planning and writing down the stories of your older relatives. Thanks so much for commenting. Have a great day.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. joannesisco · May 30, 2015

    Neither of my parents were much for talking about their past. Both were immigrants to Canada from different countries with a wealth of experiences from growing up during the Depression and surviving WWII in Europe.

    It was only after they had both passed away and I was trying to write their story as a memorial for their grandchildren that I realized how many questions I wish I had asked.

    Liked by 1 person

    • lovetotrav · May 30, 2015

      That is so difficult. I can see why they might not have shared. It is too bad you can’t rewind that clock for some things. I wish I had just paid closer attention as my dad did share but of course, I thought he would be around much longer.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. that traveling nurse · May 30, 2015

    Your post reminded me of this one (link below) I read not too long ago. I shared it on my FB page and tagged my dad since I could relate well to what the author was revealing. πŸ™‚ Safe travels!
    http://matadornetwork.com/life/dear-dad-thanks-making-traveler/

    Liked by 1 person

  7. 4wallsnaroof · May 29, 2015

    Sounds like your dad was pretty great. It’s easy to see where you get your sense of adventure! My Dad passed away over twenty years ago and there are lots of things I wished I had asked about. He grew up during the depression and spent some time working in President Roosevelt’s Civilian Conservation Corps. Then he spent some time in England as a military policeman during WWII. I wish I knew more about those times in his life.

    Liked by 1 person

    • lovetotrav · May 29, 2015

      OH boy he had some interesting moments in his life! It is sad that when we get older we want to know more and then it is maybe too late.

      Liked by 2 people

  8. Donna · May 29, 2015

    You are a family of travellers.

    Liked by 1 person

    • lovetotrav · May 29, 2015

      Yes, it runs pretty deep. I have now thankfully passed on the bug to our girls and my husband. (who previous to meeting me was strictly Boston and Florida.)

      Liked by 1 person

  9. snowsomewhere · May 29, 2015

    I’m sorry to hear about your dad. But wow, few people realise their dreams like that, good for him! Great photo, too!
    …I often wonder about how strange it is that when you die, all those memories and experiences you’ve spent your whole life accumulating just disappear. Your point of view and your thoughts disappear. I guess that’s why photos are so important to me.

    Liked by 1 person

    • lovetotrav · May 29, 2015

      Oh boy.. these are things that I think of too. I guess most are carried on by your family but still there are those… that we, as a family, don’t remember accurately anymore.

      Liked by 1 person

  10. I love the way your dad is leaning forward there to get the whole experience. I see that traveling is on your genetic code!

    Liked by 1 person

    • lovetotrav · May 29, 2015

      I never thought about that… You are right. He would be analyzing them (a university prof).

      Liked by 1 person

  11. any1mark66 · May 29, 2015

    The difference between traveler and tourist is where you go and why. I love the story. My father had pasted and there are many things to ask still. As another traveler, I can sense him sometimes. More than one picture from his camera came with hello seeing the view.

    Liked by 1 person

    • lovetotrav · May 29, 2015

      I am sure my dad will be with us when we move to Cairo… complaining about the touts! I know that he will be with me when we return to India as he loved it as much as I did. I am glad that you can sense your dad at times too. That is comforting.

      Liked by 1 person

      • any1mark66 · May 29, 2015

        Scary part. I told him I wanted to write. I did training stuff for years. No-one communicates anything in large companies well. That was my niche. Never happened. Now I write without much dialogue. πŸ˜‰

        Liked by 1 person

      • lovetotrav · May 29, 2015

        It is great to do what you want and to make it happen.

        Like

      • any1mark66 · May 29, 2015

        Writing in flash fiction is better than training stuff. Training make you understand other people’s thoughts and processing of info. Now I can use that to build characters. I’m sure your new location will do the same.

        Liked by 1 person

  12. Anabel Marsh · May 29, 2015

    Best of luck with such a major move! I am writing a blog with my Mum about her memories so I hope that will overcome the problem of unanswered questions.

    Liked by 1 person

    • lovetotrav · May 29, 2015

      A great idea! Unfortunately my mom is forgetting more and more and doesn’t have the answers either.

      Like

      • Anabel Marsh · May 29, 2015

        My Mum is still pretty sharp so it’s a good time to do it. We’ve got to the part where she met my Dad – in a kissing game. Very racy!

        Liked by 1 person

      • lovetotrav · May 29, 2015

        Ha Ha! Enjoy learning more.

        Liked by 1 person

  13. Sue Slaght · May 29, 2015

    Your Dad sounds like he was an incredible man. Such an adventurous spirit. I too would have questions for my Dad about his childhood but alas it is now too late.
    Best of luck with your move!

    Liked by 1 person

    • lovetotrav · May 29, 2015

      Yes, he was incredible. He worked hard and travelled even harder! Thanks – we may need a lot of luck on this move!

      Liked by 1 person

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