Blur: Weekly Photo Challenge

I love the imperfect when it comes to travelling but it bothers me more when it comes to photos. I am no photographer but I do know when a photo is blurred. Beauty in the blur? I am not sure, at least with mine. But as a teacher, I tend to follow rules so I will reluctantly ๐Ÿ™‚ submit this picture depicting Blurย set in Ollantaytambo, Peru.

Loving Laundry: When It Is Not Mine

When I look at my more recent travel photos, I notice a few things.

  • I still can’t take good photos ๐Ÿ™‚ but I try (an “A” for effort, a “C” for results)
  • I take photos of everyday things, in fact, things I would never take photos of in Canada – doors, people cycling, people walking, people talking, people eating, us eating, and yes, even laundry
  • I take fewer photos of the regular “touristy” things like ruins, forts, museums, statues and on and on…

Having grown up with a historian as a father, I think I have rebelled. There is something about being “dragged” to every fort in Canada, that makes me, well, a little less engaged in that side of life, and more inclined to the present everyday kind of life.

So this is how it came to be that I have recently started taking photos of laundry, other people’s, of course. And oh how I wish, that I had done so, when I was younger and travelling more, but well… in those days… my focus was more on me, how I looked, who I met, and where to have fun. Any recent photos of me travelling indicates this is no longer the case!

Yes, things change even as a traveller. So here’s to me, now, a somewhat older traveller, who loves laundry, when it’s not mine.

How it all begins.. sometimes in a lake (Lake Atitlan, Guatemala)

How it all begins.. sometimes in a lake (Lake Atitlan, Guatemala)

Laundry in Venice (of course, it looks beautiful)

Laundry in Venice (of course, it looks beautiful)

Laundry in Chefchaouen, Morocco (everything in Chef is gorgeous)

Laundry in Chefchaouen, Morocco (everything in Chef is gorgeous)

Laundry in oh so sweet, Isla Janitzio in Mexico

Laundry in oh so sweet, Isla Janitzio in Mexico

Laundry in Ollantaytambo, Peru ( a bit more on the rustic side)

Laundry in Ollantaytambo, Peru ( a bit more on the rustic side)

Laundry in Jardin, Colombia

Laundry in Jardin, Colombia

Laundry in interesting shapes

Laundry in interesting shapes

Even backpackers have to do laundry, but it is never as pretty as the locals' laundry

Even backpackers have to do laundry, but it is never as pretty as the locals’ laundry

And, oh I know that the anticipation is almost too much to bear, but more laundry posts – Middle Eastern style – are on the horizon. I can’t wait ๐Ÿ™‚

How To Be Cheap and Still Have Fun – Even with Teens

It was our first day in Ollantaytambo, a town in the Sacred Valley in Peru. When we woke up and looked outside our hotel window, we could see these fascinating ruins on the side of the mountain. I headed off early to find out the hours and the cost only to discover that a single entry fee was not possible, but a 3-day pass to all the ruins in the area was the minimum. And then multiply that by 5 and it becomes painful.

Darn! It is our first real day of the trip and I am already thinking finances. Yes, the reality of family travel requires that unfortunately, at least in our case it does.

And I know from temple fatigue (Asia) and church fatigue (Europe) that a pass to MANY ruins in the area would make that our sole focus which might be a bit over-kill with teens in tow. Or so I convinced myself.

I go back to the hotel, a little frustrated, and we find out that there is another way to see ruins in this area; the free way; the less touristy way… super bonus! Noah and Jade are up for the challenge (cousins that never get the chance to do cool stuff together) so I say, “Go for it!”

Now this is feeling perfect again; they leave which gives me alone time with Abby to discover the town at our pace. Together, we go and explore the alleys, the market (her first one which is always jaw dropping as the heads of cows never fail to amaze), and generally get lost in our little town. We go for lunch (and yes, something like this is memorable as we don’t live together in Canada so these moments are even more special) ย and after, we run back to the hotel to report our discoveries.

Noah and Jade are tired but thrilled (much better than hyper and bored) as they show us all their pics of their hike without all the tourists. You can tell that this taste of independence in a foreign country means so much more than back home.

Capping off the day at the soccer field that Abby had found, they play a few games with the local kids in the area.

What started off a little rough, ended up to be perfect.

And in the end, the kids all agree that this was their favourite stop on our trip to Peru. And it was cheap, even better for the parents ๐Ÿ™‚